African American medical professional giving a younger African American younger person a vaccination, both wearing masks. Text reads :Take Your Best SHot: Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19."

Houston Health Department Appointments

Appointments for Houston Health Department vaccine clinics are filled through January 2021, based on current supply. Additional appointments are not being scheduled at this time. 

When supply increases, the department will open the appointment portal and post the link on this page.

Learn about new appointment opportunities through email, text message, voice call, or mobile app push notification by registering for the HoustonRecovers subscription of AlertHouston

Appointments are based on vaccine availability, and current appointments may be adjusted based on the department’s allotment.

View the vaccine clinic frequently asked questions page.

Where to Get Vaccinated

Please visit the Texas COVID-19 Vaccine Provider Locations map to see providers near you who are offering the vaccine, and be sure to call ahead to see if they have vaccine supply available for you.

As vaccine availability increases in 2021 and more people become eligible, people will be able to get vaccinated at doctor’s offices, pharmacies, hospitals and other “usual” sites.

Who Currently Qualifies

Everyone who wants to get vaccinated will eventually be able to do so but initial doses are allocated for critical populations as identified by the Texas Department of State Health Services:

  • Phase 1A focuses on front-line health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities.
  • Phase 1B focuses on people 65 and older and those with medical conditional that put them at greater risk of severe illness from COVID-19.

Houston Health Department Vaccine Supply

As of January 17, the Houston Health Department received a total of 30,950 doses of vaccine. Of the allotment, the department transferred 1,900 doses to other providers and administered a total of 27,487 doses at locations including Minute Maid Park, Bayou City Event Center, its Northside, La Nueva Casa de Amigos, Sharpstown and Sunnyside health centers, the JW Peavy Senior Center, and its Acres Homes, Hiram Clarke and Magnolia multi-service centers.

General Information

As vaccines are authorized, there will be a limited supply at first as manufacturing and distribution ramps up.

Everyone who wants to get vaccinated will eventually be able to do so but initial doses are allocated for critical populations as identified by the Texas Department of State Health Services.

As vaccine availability increases in 2021, people will be able to get vaccinated at doctor’s offices, pharmacies, hospitals and other “usual” sites.

Each vaccine recipient will receive a card with information about the vaccine they received, and doses administered will be recorded in ImmTrac2, the state immunization registry, so that providers and recipients can ensure they receive the correct second dose.

Even when vaccines are available, people will need to take precautions like masking up, practicing social distancing and washing hands to help stop the spread of COVID-19 as people get vaccinated and we learn more about the immunity produced by the vaccines.

News and Updates

Visit our news page for the latest announcements.

Go to our COVID-19 vaccine clinic frequently asked questions page.

View frequently asked questions about COVID-19 vaccines on the DSHS website.

The health department is currently offering the Moderna vaccine. View the Moderna fact sheet on the FDA website.

COVID-19 Vaccine Conversations

Communities of color across Houston have been hit disproportionately hard by COVID-19, particularly the African American and Hispanic communities. It is essential to address the concerns many people of color have about vaccines due to historic and cultural factors.  Learn more at houstontx.gov/getthefacts.

Safety and Efficacy

Vaccines are cleared for Emergency Use Authorization after rigorous review by FDA based on scientific evidence about safety and effectiveness gathered through large clinical trials.

The COVID-19 vaccines in the U.S. do not use the live virus that causes COVID-19.

Having symptoms like fever after getting a vaccine is normal and a sign a person’s immune system is learning to fight the virus.

Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.
Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.
Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.
Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.
Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.
Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.
Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.
Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.
Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.
Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.
Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.
Image of person getting COVID-19 vaccination.